Taking Global Responsibility for Syria: Towards an action plan

Taking Global Responsibility for Syria: Towards an action plan

10 March 2016 14:00-15:30 Four Seasons Hotel, Segah Ballroom

The last few years have shown that no sin­gle great pow­er has the means to put an end to a con­flict of the dimen­sions of Syria’s. The Syr­i­an con­flict stands as a tes­ti­mony of the pro­gres­sive mul­ti­po­lar­i­sa­tion of inter­na­tion­al pol­i­tics, and high­lights the fail­ure of the inter­na­tion­al com­mu­ni­ty, or even a coali­tion of West­ern pow­ers; it also under­scores the neces­si­ty to com­pro­mise with the inter­ests of new or resur­gent diplo­mat­ic play­ers. Now enter­ing its fifth year, the Syr­i­an civil war appears intractable, thus requir­ing that every pow­er takes respon­si­bil­i­ty to achieve a peace­ful set­tle­ment and con­tribute to a sus­tain­able post-conflict nation-building.

  1. Is the con­flict near­ing its end? Are the Peace Talks in Vien­na actu­al­ly mak­ing pro­gress or is it just a diplo­mat­ic show with no sub­stan­tial achieve­ments?
  2. Given the mul­ti­ple intri­ca­cies of the con­flict, what would/should a peace agree­ment entail? And who would/should be in charge of its super­vi­sion?
  3. In ret­ro­spect: look­ing at the hard­ships faced by coun­tries that under­went an Arab Spring rev­o­lu­tion, should West­ern gov­ern­ments have react­ed dif­fer­ent­ly and resist­ed the over­throw­ing of pre­vi­ous Arab lead­ers? Is there a lesson that can be learned by the inter­na­tion­al com­mu­ni­ty about the chal­lenges and unknown risks that Arab Spring-like rev­o­lu­tions could bring in the future?
  4. What com­mit­ments need to be sought from lead­ers in order to paci­fy the region?